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Catholic Charities Community Services - Yonkers Office

(914) 476-2700

Immigration.Services@archny.org

 

204 Hawthorne Ave
Yonkers NY 10705

Esmeralda Hoscoy

Appointment Needed, Call In Advance

 

Catholic Charities at El Centro del Inmigrante

(347) 825-2086

info@elcentronyc.org

 

350 Port Richmond Avenue
Staten Island NY 10302

Fannie Cordova

Appointment Needed, Call In Advance, Walk-ins Allowed

 

Rockland Co. Bar Association Selects Catholic Charities Director For Liberty Bell Award - New City Patch

 
 

From Rockland County Bar Association: The Rockland County Bar Association selected Martha Robles, Director of Catholic Charities Community Services of Rockland, to receive the annual Liberty Bell Award. Through this award, Martha Robles is recognized for her outstanding service in promoting a better understanding and respect for the Constitution, the Bill of Rights, and our institutions of government. The Award is always presented on Law Day which is May 1st, 2017.

The theme of the 2017 Law Day is the 14th Amendment: Transforming American Democracy. The theme provides the opportunity to explore the many ways that the Fourteenth Amendment has reshaped American law and society. Through its Citizenship, Due Process and Equal Protection clauses, this transformative amendment advanced the rights of all Americans. It also played a pivotal role in extending the reach of the Bill of Rights to the states. Ratified during Reconstruction a century and a half ago, the Fourteenth Amendment serves as the cornerstone of landmark civil rights legislation, the foundation for numerous federal court decisions protecting fundamental rights, and a source of inspiration for all those who advocate for equal justice under law.

“Ms. Robles’ commitment to social justice and equality is what has truly distinguished her. Her work at Catholic Charities since 2006, and her advocacy for those persons who are unable to speak for themselves are her hallmarks. Ms. Robles is also an active member of the Rockland Immigration Coalition, Continuum of Care, the Haverstraw/Suffern Collaborative and the Rockland Rent Guidelines Board. Ms. Robles has worked with many of the agencies throughout Rockland to help resolve crisis whether its preventing eviction, making sure food is on the table or advocating for a fair and just society,” stated Robert B. Marcus, President, Rockland County Bar Association.

Martha Robles is the Executive Director for Catholic Charities Community Services (CCCSR), located in Haverstraw, New York. Born in the Bronx of immigrant parents, the third of six children. Martha received her Masters in Public Administration from NYU and has spent over 30 years developing and organizing programs that focus on health and human services.

In 2006 Martha Robles began her work at Catholic Charities Community Services, a not-for-profit social service agency, established in 1996 by the eighteen parishes in Rockland. It has a long-standing history of providing the basic necessities of life, such as food, shelter and emergency assistance for those in need. Through compassionate and professional case management, Catholic Charities Community Services of Rockland, assists individuals and families of all ages, from every race, ethnic background, Catholic and non-Catholic alike. Through the leadership of Martha Robles, the agency has flourished as she has ensured the efficient, economical, and effective utilization of resources to meet the needs of those serviced.

Her office is a welcoming place for all who enter, bringing hope to families and individuals who are experiencing a crisis, eviction, or who are in need of food assistance.

Martha's voice can be heard at many meetings in Rockland County, speaking forcefully about issues of social justice and equality. Martha is an active member of the Rockland Immigration Coalition, Continuum of Care, Haverstraw/Suffern Collaborative, Rockland Rent Guidelines. Because of CCCSR affiliation with Catholic Charities Archdiocese of New York she has been able to provide legal immigration services; including advocacy and speaking on behalf of those persons who are unable to speak for themselves. Martha has worked with many of the agencies throughout Rockland to help resolve crisis whether it's preventing an eviction, making sure food is on the table or advocating for a fair and just society; her voice is strong as she speaks for the voiceless. Her heart is full of compassion.

Catholic Charities Community Services of Rockland is located at 78 Hudson Avenue in Haverstraw. Find more information atwww.ccsrockland.org or by calling (845) 942-5791.

The Rockland County Bar Association (RCBA) is a nonprofit, professional association in New City, New York. It has more than 600 members and is the 6th-largest bar association outside of New York City. The association is committed to maintaining the dignity of the profession of law and increasing its usefulness in promoting the development of the law; the due administration of justice, the mutual improvement and social intercourse of its members under the restrictions and regulations established by its by-laws. For more information, visit http://www.rocklandbar.org/.

Image Courtesy Of The Rockland County Bar Association

Read More at New City Patch

Rockland Food Pantry Gets its Own Greenhouse - Nyack Patch

 
 

ROCKLAND COUNTY, NY — Catholic Charities Community Services of Rockland unveiled a new greenhouse on its property in Haverstraw New York on Earth Day. Funded by a New York State grant secured by NYS Assemblyman Ken Zebrowski, the greenhouse is the first of its kind in the New York region to be constructed for the benefit of a food pantry.

Catholic Charities Community Services of Rockland already provides healthy food choices for hundreds of families each year through generous donations of fresh produce from Stokes Farm in Tappan, as well as by growing their own vegetables in a garden on the property.

The agency's goal is to use the garden and the new greenhouse to not only provide fresh produce all year long, but to offer educational opportunities to teach children and adults about farming, the value of growing and eating fresh vegetables, and the positive environmental impact of eating fresh produce.

“One of our missions is to raise awareness about hunger and food insecurity in Rockland and bring fresh produce to our participants. Teaching them how to grow their own food provides them with a skill that they can use to help themselves in the future. The greenhouse, along with the garden, will enable us not only to grow fresh food all year long, but to teach the value of gardening and the importance of making healthy eating choices,” stated Martha Robles, Director of Catholic Charities Community Services of Rockland.

More information is available on the website at www.ccsrockland.org.

During the free event on April 22, area families enjoyed face painting, arts and crafts, clowns, a Tai Chi mini class, and a yoga demonstration. Sponsors for the day included Curti’s Landscaping, Stokes Farm, Good Samaritan Hospital WMC Health, Fidelis Care New York, Orange & Rockland, Sterling National Bank, Apple Bank, Solar City, Rockland Parent Magazine, Cornell Cooperative Extension, Michael’s, Home Depot, Green Leaf Printing, Inserra, Town of Haverstraw, United Health Care, and Union Restaurant.

In addition to Zebrowski, elected officials on hand for the event included Ed Day, County Executive; George Hoehmann, Town of Clarkstown Supervisor; Alden H. Wolf, Rockland County Legislator; Howard Phillips, Town of Haverstraw Supervisor; Michael Kohut, Village of Haverstraw Mayor; Robert D’Amelio, Village of West Haverstraw Mayor; and Paul Peperato, Rockland County Clerk.

“I am pleased to be able to secure state funding for this groundbreaking and innovative greenhouse project. The new greenhouse will transform Catholic Charities from a traditional food pantry to a self-sustaining farming initiative that will feed residents throughout the county. This sustainable approach will both promote healthy living and fight hunger insecurity in Rockland,” Zebrowski said.

Read More from Nyack Patch

Catholic Charities Monticello – Treatment Services

For a Substance Abuse Emergency call 845-794-8080 Ext 2200, For Outpatient Services Call 845-794-8080 ext 2100

ResidentialDirector@cccsos.org

 

17 Hamilton Avenue
Monticello NY 12701

Amy Kolakowski

Walk-ins Allowed

 

Catholic Charities Community Services of Orange and Sullivan provides a comprehensive continuum of services to assist individuals suffering from the disease of addiction, those in recovery who need additional support, and the family members and loved ones who support them. Utilizing evidence-based practices tailored to meet the individual’s needs, Catholic Charities follows a trauma-informed care model.

Catholic Charities Monticello – Outpatient Services

845-794-8080 ext 2100

DirectorMonticelloOPC@cccsos.org

 

396 Broadway
Monticello NY 12701

Amy Kolakowski

Call In Advance, Walk-ins Allowed

 

Catholic Charities Community Services of Orange and Sullivan provides a comprehensive continuum of services to assist individuals suffering from the disease of addiction, those in recovery who need additional support, and the family members and loved ones who support them. Utilizing evidence-based practices tailored to meet the individual’s needs, Catholic Charities follows a trauma-informed care model.

Catholic Charities Walden Clinic

845-778-5628

DirectorWalden@cccsos.org

 

8 Scofield Street
Walden NY 12586

Clinic Director

Appointment Needed, Walk-ins Allowed

 

Catholic Charities Community Services of Orange and Sullivan provides a comprehensive continuum of services to assist individuals suffering from the disease of addiction, those in recovery who need additional support, and the family members and loved ones who support them. Utilizing evidence-based practices tailored to meet the individual’s needs, Catholic Charities follows a trauma-informed care model.

Catholic Charities Port Jervis Clinic

845-856-6344

DirectorPortJervis@cccsos.org

 

17-19 Sussex Street
Port Jervis NY 12771

Clinic Director

Appointment Needed, Walk-ins Allowed

 

Catholic Charities Community Services of Orange and Sullivan provides a comprehensive continuum of services to assist individuals suffering from the disease of addiction, those in recovery who need additional support, and the family members and loved ones who support them. Utilizing evidence-based practices tailored to meet the individual’s needs, Catholic Charities follows a trauma-informed care model.

Catholic Charities Newburgh Clinic

845-562-8255

DirectorNewburgh@cccsos.org

 

280 Broadway
Lower Level
Newburgh NY 12550

Margaret O'Connell-Duffy

Appointment Needed, Walk-ins Allowed

 

Finding Treatment

Catholic Charities Community Services of Orange and Sullivan provides a comprehensive continuum of services to assist individuals suffering from the disease of addiction, those in recovery who need additional support, and the family members and loved ones who support them. Utilizing evidence-based practices tailored to meet the individual’s needs, Catholic Charities follows a trauma-informed care model.

Catholic Charities Monroe Clinic

845-782-0295

DirectorMonroe@cccsos.org

 

101 Carpenter Place
Monroe NY 10950

Judith Kohout

Call In Advance, Walk-ins Allowed

 

Catholic Charities Community Services of Orange and Sullivan provides a comprehensive continuum of services to assist individuals suffering from the disease of addiction, those in recovery who need additional support, and the family members and loved ones who support them. Utilizing evidence-based practices tailored to meet the individual’s needs, Catholic Charities follows a trauma-informed care model.

Catholic Charities Middletown Clinic

845-343-7675

DirectorMiddletown@cccsos.org

 

305 North Street
Middletown NY 10940

Clinic Director

Call In Advance, Walk-ins Allowed

 

Catholic Charities Community Services of Orange and Sullivan provides a comprehensive continuum of services to assist individuals suffering from the disease of addiction, those in recovery who need additional support, and the family members and loved ones who support them. Utilizing evidence-based practices tailored to meet the individual’s needs, Catholic Charities follows a trauma-informed care model.

Catholic Charities Restart Program at Orange-Ulster BOCES/Goshen

Restart@cccsos.org

 

4 Harriman Drive
Goshen NY 10924

Christine Richardson

 

Catholic Charities Community Services of Orange and Sullivan provides a comprehensive continuum of services to assist individuals suffering from the disease of addiction, those in recovery who need additional support, and the family members and loved ones who support them. Utilizing evidence-based practices tailored to meet the individual’s needs, Catholic Charities follows a trauma-informed care model.

Catholic Charities Goshen Clinic

845-294-5888

DirectorGoshen@cccsos.org

 

27 Matthews Street
Goshen NY 10924

Mary LaRouge

Call In Advance, Walk-ins Allowed

 

Catholic Charities Community Services of Orange and Sullivan provides a comprehensive continuum of services to assist individuals suffering from the disease of addiction, those in recovery who need additional support, and the family members and loved ones who support them. Utilizing evidence-based practices tailored to meet the individual’s needs, Catholic Charities follows a trauma-informed care model.

Finding Soup Kitchens - Other Resources

 
 

Here are some organizations Catholic Charities works with who can help find a soup kitchen near to you.

Here are two other numbers for information and referral specialists:  

  • In NYC dial 311

  • In NYS dial 211 (outside NYC)

Find additional information and resources available on our website:  

More Soup Kitchen Resources

Panel Examines Immigration Through Catholic Lens - Catholic New York

 
 

In an illustration involving the plight of today’s refugees, two speakers at a recent immigration forum posed, from different perspectives, the necessity of the flight into Egypt of Joseph, Mary and the Child Jesus.

“Perhaps the strongest message from Jesus about strangers and refugees and migrants is not what he said, but what he did,” said Father James Martin, S.J., an author and editor at large of the Jesuit weekly magazine America. “After his birth, Mary and Joseph take Jesus from Israel into Egypt. It is called ‘the Flight into Egypt,’ and the angel says, ‘take refuge in Egypt.’

“Mary and Joseph and their son are fleeing persecution and the threat of death at the hands of King Herod,” he said. “Using the contemporary definition, when we think about refugees and migrants and who are welcome, we can say that among all the refugees that the world has seen, among all those people, were three people who really should matter to us, and that we do know: Mary, Joseph and Jesus.”

Father Martin was one of three panelists who participated in “Immigration: A Catholic Perspective,” held April 18 at St. Ignatius Loyola parish in Manhattan. The forum also featured C. Mario Russell, director and senior attorney of Immigrant and Refugee Services for Catholic Charities Community Services of the archdiocese, and Dr. Meghan J. Clark, assistant professor of moral theology at St. John’s University in Queens, who is a faculty expert for the Holy See’s Mission to the United Nations coordinated by St. John’s Vincentian Center for Church and Society.

The evening forum, sponsored by the parish’s Ignatian Social Justice Committee, was moderated by Dr. Anna Brown, associate professor and chair of political science at St. Peter’s University in Jersey City, N.J.

Ms. Clark, in her remarks, also referred to the Holy Family’s flight into Egypt, from the perspective of a political scientist she knows at The Catholic University of America in Washington, D.C.: “The Roman Empire called the entire region, that includes the Holy Land, Syria.

“So,” she continued, “quite literally, when Jesus, Mary and Joseph fled into Egypt they were Syrian refugees.”

Father Martin, in a thoughtful anecdote about working in the Jesuit Refugee Service in East Africa during his priestly formation, spoke about a lesson he learned the hard way about the importance of not categorizing people.

He worked with urban refugees between 1992 and 1994 in Nairobi, Kenya, which, he situated historically, was in between the crises in Somalia and Rwanda, “a real period of great turmoil.”

“One of the primary lessons that I learned,” he said, “is that people are not categories.”

“When I worked at a hospital with ‘sick people,’ as a novice I thought that I’d be working with ‘sick people,’ and whatever ‘sick people’ were concerned about...”

He soon learned he was working with “individuals” who had individual names and individual problems. The same could be said for working with those who are homeless, he said.

It was the same lesson he learned when asked to do some intake work with refugees. “I had studied a little Swahili and I was ready and I had in my mind perhaps the same kind of images that a lot of Americans, maybe some people in this crowd have, about refugees, migrants, that you see pictures of…”

A faceless mass of people, those who may be dirt farmers or cattle herders, came to mind, he said. “In a sense, in my ignorance, I thought, they’re kind of used to this life, they’re poor and just moving from one place to another.”

A Somali man, raggedly clad in polyester pants, a light blue shirt and flip-flops. changed his mind. “I said to him…‘before we start, what language would you like to speak in? He said, with a little wry smile, ‘We can speak in English…Swahili…French…Italian…Latin, and in Ancient Greek.’”

The refugee was a philosophy professor at the University of Mogadishu in Somalia who had to leave there with his family in the midst of his flourishing career and academic life and livelihood.

“It just shifted everything within me,” Father Martin said. “What I realized was, these are our brothers and sisters in Christ. These are people like all of us: professors, teachers, lawyers, doctors, mothers, fathers, tailors, bakers.”

In the conversation of refugees and migrants and the immigration issue, he learned that “we’re talking about individuals who have the same kinds of hopes and dreams and desires for themselves and for their families that we do, that everyone in this country does.”

“It reminded me,” Father Martin said, “that this is what Jesus does—Jesus does not see categories.”

Russell, in his presentation, approached the topic of categories differently. “Law is about categories. Lawyers who do social justice,” he said, to some extent successfully strive “to place the human and the question of dignity into the intersection of law, policy and politics.”

Father Dennis J. Yesalonia, S.J., pastor of St. Ignatius, in the forum’s concluding remarks, noted the timing of the forum in relation to Easter Sunday, April 16. “Two days ago, whether it was in this church or any church you would have been, we celebrated the most significant event in human history…”

The immigration panel, “each one in her or his own way,” the pastor said, “spoke about suffering, the suffering of those who are neighbors—our sisters and brothers who are struggling now.”

“The question that each one of our panelists presented is, what will we do to help them?

“And as sure as we celebrated Easter Sunday, we will celebrate the victory and rights of every human being,” he continued, “to enjoy the same extraordinary rights of freedom and liberty that we have…

Such a cross, Father Yesalonia concluded, “bears being kept in mind, this day will be overcome, but it needs the support and understanding of each one of us. So God be with us.”

Read More from Catholic New York

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Catholic Charities Help Line:
888-744-7900

Catholic Charities Main Office:
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11th Floor
New York, NY 10022

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